Slowly

It’s time for another update.  Seems we’re making it on the long list of “taking-longer-than-expected” tiny house constructions (already), but we had a long discussion with our building contractors yesterday and I have to say I feel actually relieved that we’re taking it slow.  There are many things that need to be well thought about and determined before the framing begins – the exact location of the windows and the door, a list of all appliances and their specifications (that’s why you’re now able to click on every item in our list of costs) with their exact location in the house, as well as finding solutions for the first issues that have come up, for example: How or what do you build around the wheel well to keep water from entering your house (the blueprints don’t state an appropriate solution for our thorough contractors)?  With all this going on we’re definitely skipping a place on the creative list of all “design-as-you-go” tiny house constructions, but knowing that our runaway shanty will be professionally built to withstand the most extreme weather situation will hopefully make up for this.  What do you think?

The sad news is, I have to start a list of costs that I will name “experiences”, which, despite the promising name, is no more than a list of wasted money.  I know we would (from time to time) invest in unnecessary things (I consider it inevitable), but it does hurt every time I realize it, especially so early on.  What I’m talking about right now is our door.  Yes, our pretty door.  The item that took us weeks of careful consideration turned out to be too… tall.  Yikes!  Besides a big box of sheep’s wool insulation we now have a halfway painted door for sale. At least we can keep the door handle. Finding a new door is now the contractor’s job, but we’ve still got blue paint and a blue door it will be, no matter what. Period.

Two more rods will be added that will, together with two of these neat metal brackets, hold our door in place.

Two more rods will be added to the trailer. They will, together with two of these neat metal brackets, hold our door in place and keep it from twisting.

The contractors explain what they will do to keep water/moisture from entering our house through the wheel well.

The contractors explain what they will do to keep water/moisture from entering our tiny house through the wheel well.

Markings on the subfloor show the exact location of windows and door.

Markings on the subfloor show the exact location of windows and door.

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2 Responses to Slowly

  1. Martha Brouwer says:

    Tumbleweed’s video is worth every penny of it’s cost…it will SAVE you money in the long run. They show you exactly how to avoid water problems at the wheel areas. Also have already solved torque issues and so forth. The custom made door is to die for! Best construction video possible and that is coming from someone who with ex-husband, built a passive solar house from the ground up.

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